"We Need To Take a Global Approach"

We interviewed our Richard von Weizsäcker-Fellow Lloyd Axworthxy. He is sure that the refugee crisis demands global solutions.

680_33_Axworthy_Meldung

You were the Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs and Minister of Labor. Now, you’re working on refugee policy in Germany. What can Germany learn from Canada?
 

Lloyd Axworthy:I’m impressed with the great interest in the issue that prevails in Germany. But like anywhere in the world, refugees are often seen as a threat. Our experience in Canada shows that accepting refugees can be a good thing – if you approach it the right way.
 

What exactly is going so right in Canada?
 

We have a concept for providing private support for refugees, for example. Neighbors, families, or even church communities can come together and pool their resources to support a refugee – from language classes to helping them with their shopping. In this way, the refugees no longer feel so isolated, and the Canadians feel like they are making a contribution to societal development.
 

Do Germans not have this same sentiment?
 

I have the impression that there’s a lot of enthusiasm here. But there aren’t many opportunities to make use of that enthusiasm, because refugees can’t really become part of a community here.
 

Have you observed this problem around the world?
 

Yes. I was at a refugee camp in Jordan recently; 80,000 refugees live there, and they have no opportunities to get involved in the community.
 

Your vision is a global refugee agency. Is that realistic?
 

It’s necessary. Currently, there are 22 million refugees, and that number is rising. They’re not just fleeing political persecution anymore; they’re trying to escape the consequences of climate change and many other things. We need to take a global approach. Some countries don’t want to take in any refugees, while others are taking in more than they can handle. The system is in a state of collapse.
 

You founded the World Refugee Council during your fellowship. Is that the first step on this path?
 

At the very least, we have a clear mission: We need to start looking for solutions. The fellowship gave me the opportunity to make numerous important contacts. Ministers in the council hold discussions with activists and refugees. To find a solution, everyone needs to work together.

You could also be interested in

How to Escape from the Neighborhood Trap: Four Recommendations

Neighborhoods are worth investing in. Instead of being the focal points of the next economic or epidemiological catastrophe, they can be places of hope and resilience that nurture the generation that will lead the fight against adversity.

Read more

The German EU Presidency and Stability in Eastern Mediterranean

In the age of COVID-19, the European Union is functioning in a unified way when it comes to economic and health policy. However, unifying European foreign policy is fundamental, too, and Brussels should make this happen now in the region of the Eastern...

Read more

Christian Democrats Must Defend their Liberal Identity

In this time of crisis, the Christian vision of politics has enormous potential. But its democratic proponents must act boldly as the populist right wing is occupying its values. In Hungary, in the name of Christian Democracy Viktor Orban has...

Read more